My values: Starting autoethnography

What would you think of yourself if you met yourself? That’s what I’ve been thinking about this week. I am taking a module called ‘Moving into Academic Leadership’ for my MA in Higher Education. It’s a highly reflective module that gives us space to explore our experiences, cultural perspectives, traits and values. The assignment for the module is an autoethnographic narrative. Ethnography is the in-depth study of a particular culture or phenomenon, usually over an extended period of time, and using what we call qualitative research methods of observation and interviews. Autoethnography then, is simply a study of oneself. The difference between autoethnography and autobiography is that a biography is more descriptive, whereas an ethnography tries to understand something (in this case myself) through a process of analysis. I’m really looking forward to this and think it comes at a great time for me as I move forward in my career to take on more responsibility and need to think about what kind of ‘leader’ I wish to be.

We’ve been doing a range of exercises over the last fortnight to begin to explore our own biography and cultural influences. One of those exercises was to pick five values that are most important to us as individuals. I thought I’d share mine:

My values

Kindness: small acts of kind really do make a difference to daily life. Big acts of kindness can change the world.
Mindfulness: yes it’s a buzz word but it’s also a trait I try to live by, and by this I mean both being mindful to a task and therefore trying to do it diligently as well as giving myself the head space to recharge mentally and meditate.
Integrity: I see this as trying to stay true to my word and appreciating when others do the same. It’s difficult. I’ve largely successfully boycotted Amazon for years (it’s not so hard) but then my boyfriend bought me a kindle for my birthday 😉
Courage: acts of courage are the only way society progresses and on an individual level I really value the opportunity to keep learning and gaining from new experiences, even if they are frightening.
Fairness/equality: Not only is inequality unfair and unkind but the evidence points to greater equality being better for everyone.

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