Discover Ethical Products Every Month by Subscription

Subscription boxes are definitely hot right now. It’s not unusual to have a regular veg box delivered to your door, but you can also get monthly deliveries of tea, razors and socks. These aren’t particularly fun things though are they? (although I do love tea and socks).

May contents of This Good Box

May contents of This Good Box

I had a very nice delivery recently, a small box of ethical goodies from This Good Box. This Good Box makes it easy to discover fantastic ethical or natural products as you sign up to have a small selection posted to you (or a friend) every month. You can also buy individual boxes without subscribing, and each month is focused on a theme.

May = CREATE. And this was the box I received recently through my letter box.

The box exceeded my expectations – at first I wasn’t sure whether a regular supply of more ‘stuff’ sat comfortably with the slow consumption cause but looking through the contents I soon realised it offered so much more than just stuff. Founder, Lianne Howard-Dace, wanted to encourage the contents to be shared. As part of my ‘Create’ box I had some yummy Fairtrade organic chocolate from Chocolate and Love, a natural cuticle butter by Filbert of Dorset, a felt brooch making set, Sarah Corbett’s ‘A Little Book of Craftivism’ (worth checking out) and fabric pens to decorate my own plain bag. A note inside provides suggestions of ways to share the contents and spread the word, by sharing the chocolate with someone I haven’t spoken to before, or making the brooch to pass to a friend. At the moment it’s aimed at women but they hope to launch a men’s box in the future.

Craftivism and fabric pens from this good box
Chocolate and love Fairtrade
This Good Box

I hadn’t heard about the chocolate company before, so it’s a great way to promote small brands and ethical products. Keen to speak to Lianne about This Good Box, she happily answered my eager questions (and offered an exclusive discount code, see the end of the post!) –

1. Where did the idea for This Good Box come from?

It came from something in my own life really. I wanted to live in a better way and learn where to find great ethical products – at the same time I was enjoying receiving several subscription boxes and had the idea to bring the two things together. I just had to see if anyone else would want to buy it as well and it looks like they do!

2. How do you source the products each month?

Sometimes I’ll think of a useful item that works for the month’s theme and set out to find an ethical version which is easier with some products than others! Other times I’ll discover a brand and know I need to get it in the box or a social enterprise might contact me and we’ll see how they might fit with future boxes. Everything has to be able to fit through the letterbox as well so it’s a big challenge but one of my favourite parts of running This Good Box.

3. The box offers ideas of ways to share it’s contents, why do you think this is important?

From the offset I wanted a random acts of kindness vibe to run through what we’re doing and the products are so shareable it really lends itself to that. I can be quite introverted by nature but I really believe that connectivity with the people around us is so important; we can’t solve the problems facing our world without each other. Community is really important in my life so I want to find little ways for people to build a sense of it in their own lives. Sometimes getting out of our comfort zone is incredibly rewarding!

*DISCOUNT* This Good Box have kindly offered a promo code for any readers of my blog to get £10 off your first box. Use EMMAGOODBOX1 to get £10 off a one-off purchase and EMMAGOODBOX to get £10 off any subscription plan. That equates to a box of ethical goodies for just £7.50 + P&P! Get yours from www.thisgoodbox.co.uk

Filberts of Dorset natural beauty

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Pants to Poverty Discount Code

Pants to Poverty

Pants to Poverty is planning a relaunch for 2015 amidst exciting plans to live and work with suppliers in India. The brand, which is a familiar one to conscious consumers, are furthering their work to support sustainable business relationships by moving operations to their farmer’s office in Odisha, India, for a few weeks. The trip aims to let the Pants to Poverty staff document and assist with the harvest of the organic cotton that goes into making Pantabulous products. It’s a wonderful chance for the team to be fully involved in the ‘cotton to bottom’ process and whilst the relaunch won’t involve a significant change in product offering, the trip will no doubt inspire the team to develop new shapes and styles.

P2P IMAGE 5

You can buy Pants to Poverty online, plus they have a wide list of stockists across the UK. The lovely team have offered an exclusive discount code to readers of Ethical High Street, you just need to quote ETHICALHIGHSTREET (in caps) online to get 10% off. Why not stock up on new undies for winter? They make great gifts/stocking fillers too!

Read more on Ethical High Street (which, by the way, now features the indie ethical shop directory)

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Ethical Leather Bags & Accessories by Yorkshire-Based Magpie Accessories

Camerastrap

Unwrapping my beautifully packaged new leather camera strap from Magpie Accessories, I was in awe of how soft the leather was at first touch. The violet camera strap was the perfect accessory to jazz up my SLR, attaching elegantly with a buckle fastening. Magpie Accessories manufacture high-quality leather bags and accessories from their studio in Yorkshire, England. They are a luxury British brand with ethics and sustainability at their heart.

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Established by Kathryn Sillince in 2008 with the help of a Princes Trust loan and Arts Council grant, Magpie Accessories officially launched in 2010. Kathryn started conceptualising the brand in 2006, when as a student of the London College of Fashion, she began researching leather suppliers and material processes for making leather goods. This can be a total minefield. The processing of leather is very labour intensive for people and planet, and it is difficult as a consumer to know which brands to trust with their leather sourcing. With this in mind, Kathryn wanted to go about it the right way, ensuring that every aspect of her business was as ethical as possible and building a brand that consumers could trust.

This led to a range of handcrafted goods produced in the finest locally sourced leather. Each leather hide comes from an organically fed animal and is a by-product of the food industry. The hides are sourced from local farms around the UK, not shipped halfway around the world, and each piece is handcrafted in the Yorkshire based studio. As the label grows they are committed to keeping manufacturing in the UK, supporting British industry and keeping their carbon footprint low. Magpie produce men’s and women’s bags, everything from clutches to travel bags, as well as laptop and smartphone sleeves, guitar straps, camera straps, passport holders and glasses cases. They pride themselves on the ability to work directly with customers and offer personalised embossing on many of their products.

In addition to using the best quality leathers, the linings of all products are made with organic fair trade cottons, using water-based eco-friendly inks for prints. All orders are beautifully gift-wrapped in eco-paper. I thoroughly enjoyed trying out my camera strap. Not only does it look smart and sophisticated, but it is made to the highest quality and feels entirely safe and secure at holding my camera. In addition to the plain straps, they offer fun character designs including a ‘Gerald Giraffe’ and ‘Finlay Frog’. I’ve definitely got my eye on their glorious messenger bags too, perfect for work and play.

You can get your own handcrafted leather loveliness online at www.magpieaccessories.com or at one of their stockists.

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