Back to Basics Collection by FAUSTINE STEINMETZ Handwoven and Handmade

This season Steinmetz takes her collection “back to basics”, looking at the numerous ways in which a staple item can be reproduced, using illusions to create fabrics which are not what they seem at first glance. For SS16, the designer also acknowledges the artist that made her want to become a designer – Joseph Kosuth. After seeing “One and Three Chairs” in a book at the age of 14, Steinmetz believes her mind was opened to visual arts in a way that she still cannot explain today.

Faustine Steinmetz is the latest recipient of COTTON USA’s highly coveted sponsorship for SS16, an advocacy programme that helps up-and-coming designers to showcase their talent and creativity, bringing the vision for their collection to life through the versatility of U.S cotton.

Steinmetz puts her own twist on iconic pieces, and this includes weaving her own fabric using a traditional handloom in her London studio. This attention to detail to create quality, long-lasting garments is just one of the merits that made Steinmetz a great fit for the COTTON USA sponsorship.

The sponsorship programme has been a valuable platform for budding designers to elevate their work. Previous recipients of the sponsorship include Richard Nicholl, Meadham Kirchhoff, PPQ, Preen, Louise Gray and palmer//harding.

Steinmetz said: “I am thrilled to have been selected to receive the sponsorship for a second season. Support for young designers like myself provides a platform to express our creativity and showcase our vision.” She continued “What I love about U.S. cotton is not only the exceptional quality and versatility, but also knowing that the fibres I am using to hand make my designs have been responsibly produced – this is very important to me when sourcing my materials.”

The Parisian-born designer began her studies at Atelier Chardon Savard in Paris before moving to London to complete her Masters at Central Saint Martins, under the guidance of Professor OBE Louise Wilson. Having worked for the likes of Jeremy Scott and Henrik Vibskov, Faustine set up her label in early 2013 after acquiring her first handloom. All of Steinmetz’s pieces are made in accordance with her belief in craftsmanship over trend, designing staple pieces for the everyday woman.

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January Sales on Ethical Fashion, Eco Living and Sustainable Style

Ethical fashion often gets criticized for being too expensive compared to the staple high street stores. Sale season therefore offers a great opportunity to try out a new brand or treat yourself to something you wouldn’t normally buy with many eco brands offering brilliant deals online and in stores.

Over at Ethical High Street I round up some of the sale offers available for womenswear, menswear and kidswear. You can check them all out here.

Other ethical fashion and sustainable clothing brands on sale include:
whomadeyourpants – 30% off pants ethically made in Southampton.
Chinti and Parker – up to 70% off mens and womenswear including 100% cashmere knits.
High-fashion led pieces at COSSAC
Mens and womens casual wear at Howies
Beyond Skin – 30% off vegan shoes
Pure Collection – Up to 70% off cashmere
Mud & Water – up to 50% off womenswear
Liv – sale on clothing and gifts

Classic Arun knit from Liv, produced by British knitters Peregrine. Now £47.40 from £79

Classic Arun knit from Liv, produced by British knitters Peregrine. Now £47.40 from £79

Taking a look at the offers available from Ethical Superstore is a must. The online shop stocks everything from ethical fashion to eco kettles all now on sale. The Christmas clearance includes discounts on ethically produced decorations and Divine chocolate. They have special offers all year round and free delivery on purchases over £50. See for yourself at http://www.ethicalsuperstore.com/
wooden-elephant-block

Finally, what if you received an unwanted gift this year? Or the kids got duplicate presents? You can use the boot sale app Shpock to turn those items into cash by selling them on in your local area. Find out more here. It’s the perfect environmentally-friendly way of selling things on or buying second-hand items locally.

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A Week in the Life of Ethical Dressing

Dear people who ask me what ethical fashion is,

To coincide with London Fashion Week I decided to do a week in the life of ethical dressing to show that there are many ways to take part in ethical fashion. It doesn’t have to be expensive, and it can be fashionable (even if you might not approve of my personal style). London Fashion Week showcases the next season trends but the most sustainable thing to do is dress true to yourself. Buy things that you love and will wear again and again. There are lots of ways to dress ethically, for example:

• Buying second-hand or vintage clothes
• Buying fair trade, ethically made clothes from ethical brands
• Buying organic cotton clothing
• Buying locally produced clothing
• Making your own clothes
• Upcycling/recycling
• You can still shop on the high street, but buy good quality that you will keep for years.

AVOID CHEAP, FAST FASHION.

I signed up to What I Wore Today to post my outfits last week and will continue to do so! Here’s the round-up. There’s no fancy photography here, I do apologise.

The particularly observant amongst you will notice I got my hair cut 🙂

Day 1: No Nasties organic cotton tee and upcycled denim shorts (jeans given to me by my sister which were too tight so I chopped the legs off)
Day 1

Day 2: Vintage M&S dress bought from Oxfam, Urban Outfitters Urban Renewal upcycled man’s shirt (taken from other sister who didn’t wear it), charity shop belt
day 2 eco outfit
m&s vintage label

Day 3: Organic cotton Edun dress. Had it for years and just keep wearing it.
Edun dress

Day 4: John Smedley organic cotton, undyed, made in England sweater, charity shop Topshop trouser
ecooutfit4

Day 5: Vintage Chelsea Girl dress (altered to fit), Banana Republic charity shop wool cardigan (had a small hole in it I stitched up, make-do-and-mend!)
eco outfit 5

Day 6: People Tree fair trade, organic cotton Peter Jensen Bear Sweatshirt, Monkee Genes organic cotton, fair trade skinny jeans
ecooutfit6label
ecooutfit6

I wore these for a couple of days too. Shoes in the pictures are Clarks and Barratts – buy quality shoes which last. iPhone – yeah that’s not so ethical, but allows me to work!

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